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Conservation

Protecting what we have so future generations can enjoy the unspoiled land, and the clean air and water that we enjoy.

Metroparks actively works to preserve the best examples of Northwest Ohio’s natural areas for public enjoyment. Protecting forests, grasslands, rivers, and wetlands, promoting sustainable use, is the most important work that we do.

Articles Tagged in Conservation, Resources, Protection

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A Doodlebug’s Story

Its story is written on the sand in the early morning light. Trails of scribbles and strange, twisted etchings scrawled by a mysterious creature called a “doodlebug” during the dark of the night.

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The Jeweled Acrobats

Dragonflies are some of the oldest insects on earth. These beautiful animals took to the air long before dinosaurs walked the earth and were enormous---- the largest having a wingspan of two and a half feet! However, today, you may only encounter a “large” dragonfly at only three inches long. Lucas County is home to approximately 95 species of Odonata (dragonflies and damselflies) and Ohio has more than 150 species, with interesting names like “Dragonhunter,” “Dasher,” “Darner,” and “Clubtail.”

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“Unexpected” Findings in the Oak Openings

Sometimes there is joy in the “unexpected.” In the Oak Openings region, the “unexpected” may appear as a new research finding, a certain state-listed plant found emerging in a newly restored area or the discovery of a rare wildlife species.

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The “Sand Runners”

A buzzy, insect-like “tick tucka zreeeee” resonates from the lower tip of a plant stalk in the middle of the prairie. A hidden “tssssslipp” echoes underfoot in two or three spots. These interesting sounds always add some mystery to the spring and summer grasslands in special places of the Oak Openings region.

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Hidden Homes

Most of us visiting a Metropark during the spring and summer won’t realize just how many birds are watching us from their nests as we pass them by on the trails or by boat. Birds and their nests are often quietly camouflaged or hidden in the grasses, wetland vegetation, or small shrubs. Numerous species of birds choose Metroparks to call “home,” during the summer months, due to the fact that these natural areas offer abundant food and excellent habitat.

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Aerial Acrobats

Tree swallows -- also known in the birding world as aerial insectivores -- are capable of ingesting 2,000 insects a day!

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Floats for Fledglings

Cooperative effort between The Ohio Division Wildlife and Metroparks Toledo, you might have a chance to view Common terns on your next visit Howard Marsh Metropark.

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Toledo's Frogtown

Before settlement, north Toledo and downtown encompassed a mosaic of different natural habitats that included mostly marshland, as well as forest and prairie. Wetland areas along the banks of the Maumee and surrounding areas, were a popular haven for large numbers of frogs and toads, and early Toledo was appropriately dubbed the name “Frogtown.”

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A Snake’s Way

The prominent, upturned nose and unique color patterns should give it away, but that’s not always likely with the hognose snake.

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Colorful Seasons Ahead

As April comes to a chilly end, and we wrap up the first Ohio Native Plant Month, keep in mind that the season for native plants is just beginning.

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Humming Along

Every spring, Ruby-throated hummingbirds make their long-distance migration back to northwest Ohio to take advantage of the abundant food sources and good nesting sites.

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Flight of the Bumble bee

After a long winter’s nap, the queen bumble bee emerges from her underground throne on the first warm days of spring.

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Passing the Time

This sleepy barred owl found near Secor Metropark patiently passes the time by soaking up some sun and getting some rest.

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Celebrating Women in History

As we celebrate Women’s History month, Metroparks Toledo is proud to recognize the legacy women have had on our industry. From local naturalists to the most notable scientists, women have been impacting the environmental field for over a century.

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A Marsh & More: New Park Advances Many Goals

Howard Marsh will benefit Lake Area, provide additional recreation opportunities and put Metroparks Toledo a step closer to fulfilling its promise of a park within five miles of every home in the county.

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Howard Marsh Contract Awarded

The Board of Park Commissioners has approved a contract with Mark Haynes Construction of Norwalk for the construction of Howard Marsh Metropark near the Lake Erie shore in Jerusalem Township.

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2016 Winter Deer Cull Concludes

More than 6,000 lbs of ground venison was donated to local food charities following a winter culling operation at Oak Openings Preserve and Wildwood Preserve.

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Volunteers Survey Vernal Pools

The Metroparks Vernal Pool Monitoring Program raises public awareness about the existence of these habitats while allowing people to participate in interesting and important field-research.

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Long-term Butterfly Monitoring

There are five butterfly transects monitored in the Metroparks, currently: three occur in Oak Openings Preserve, one at Wildwood Preserve and one at Swan Creek Preserve.

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'Condo' Shelters Bats At Oak Openings

It is important to conserve our bat species, as they play a very important ecological role as major predators of night flying insects, like mosquitoes and agricultural pests

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