Two Future Metroparks Named

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The Board of Park Commissioners today approved names for new parks in North and East Toledo, both of which are expected to be under construction in the next few months.

“We name things we care about,” said Board President Scott J. Savage, adding that the board and staff gave careful consideration to both designations.

Glass City Metropark

The future Metropark on the east side of the Maumee River, across from Downtown Toledo, will share the City of Toledo’s unofficial nickname, the Glass City, a title that is as relevant now as it was more than 100 years ago. The name refers to the city’s history, art and architecture as well as the industries for which it became known as the Glass Capital of the World.

“We have a policy for naming our parks, and that policy guides our decision making,” Mr. Savage said. “But it does not lead our hearts. What leads us is a vision for our future and a respect for our heritage.

“The landmark known as Glass City Metropark is the result of months of input and discussion, and transcends any possible division a name might invoke.”

In choosing a name, the board wanted to represent both the east side and downtown, uniting them as one city.

Toledo is still known as the Glass Capital. Glass manufacturing began here in the 1880s, and the region remains the home of companies who manufacture glass or trace their roots to the industry.

The Toledo Museum of Art has one of the most important glass collections in the world, and was the birthplace of the Studio Glass Movement in the 1960s.

And the view from the future Metropark on the east bank of the Maumee River is a city skyline dominated by glass buildings, some of which were built by companies rooted in the glass industry.

“When this park and future waterfront revitalization garners national attention, its name will point back to our region, further bolstering local pride in our riverfront and Metropark system,” Mr. Savage said.

The first phase of construction at Glass City is expected to be completed this year.

Manhattan Marsh Preserve

A new park planned for the North River neighborhood is already known by the name Manhattan Marsh, which incorporates the historical name of the area, the Village of Manhattan, as well as the dominant natural feature, a marsh. For as long as Metroparks has had an interest in the property, it has been referred to by that name.

The word “Preserve” has been added to the name to represent the property’s future: Metroparks has an environmental covenant – a permanent, binding agreement – that will allow the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Ohio EPA the ability to enforce restrictions on future use of the property to ensure that it will always be maintained as a natural area preserve with limited passive recreational use.

Mr. Savage noted that when Manhattan Marsh opens, later this year or early next year, it will fulfill Metroparks pledge to the community to place a park within five miles of every resident of Lucas County.